11 Mistakes Made by Yoga Beginners (And How to Fix Them)


If you're new to yoga and it's your first time going to a yoga class, here are a few things you may want to know as you get started.
 
These are some common mistakes made by beginner yogis, but they can be easily fixed. The first have to do with proper etiquette and proper preparation when you arrive at the yoga studio for class


Do your best to arrive on time for class. If it is your first time to the studio, it may take some extra time to get registered for the class, sign the appropriate waivers, and receive an overview of the studio policies. Arriving 10 to 15 minutes early would be ideal. That way, you have time to change your clothes, make your way into the class, set up, and prepare for your class.
 

Be On Time


And remaining on the quiet tip, if you come to class with friends or have developed some friendships after attending several yoga classes, refrain from conversations during class. This is not only disruptive to your fellow yogis and instructor, but it also pulls you way from your personal yoga practice. This is a time for you to focus fully on yourself and your needs. Engaging in conversation would be considered rude and inappropriate.

And speaking of quiet, be sure to turn off your cell phone before entering class. If there is a place to store and lock your personal items outside the classroom, that would be ideal. But if you need to bring in your valuables, take the time to turn off your phone completely, or place it on vibrate if you're expecting an emergency message or call.

Turn Off Your Cell Phone

No Talking

Enter Class Quietly

If you happen to be late for a class, however, it is important to be courteous to your fellow yogis. If class has started, enter very quietly. It is possible that the instructor is setting the tone of the class with silence, deep breathing, meditation, or chanting. Respect these rituals and stand still near the door before entering to set up your mat. Only when the class begins should you then enter to set up. Be mindful of others around you: roll out your mat quietly and wait for the appropriate time to retrieve your yoga props.


It is best not to have a full meal before taking a yoga class. Your body needs adequate time to digest, plus a full stomach may leave you feeling bloated and uncomfortable while practicing yoga. Performing twisting postures, for example, may leave you feeling nauseous. Instead, have a very light snack, like yogurt, nuts, or fruit before practicing. Staying hydrated before and after class is also a good idea.


 
A question that is sometimes brought up when attending a yoga class is what to wear. This may depend on the type of yoga class you're visiting.
 
Generally, you want to wear clothing that is comfortable and allows for easy movement. Avoid wearing items of clothing that are too binding; you will feel uncomfortable in some of your yoga poses and it will distract you from your practice. Likewise, try not to wear clothing that is too loose or baggy. This too will turn your attention away from your practice.
 
If attending a Hot Yoga class, you are certain to sweat, so minimal attire is fine to wear. (Just be sure your clothing is socially appropriate and not revealing.) For women, a supportive sports bra and short shorts can be worn in a hot yoga class. Men, you may go shirtless with short shorts. Make sure to wear an athletic supporter or have appropriate liners in your shorts so there are no accidental exposures. Other classes that involve a good amount of movement may require comfortable fitting, easy flowing clothing. For non-moving classes, like yoga meditation, long pants and long sleeved shirts may be conducive to the practice since you are not moving much, but you want to maintain a comfortable body temperature while you're in class.



Unless you have specific medical conditions, take off your shoes and socks before you enter the yoga practicing space. Often the yoga floors are primed or made of special materials, so wearing shoes into the studio would be counterproductive. Often, there is a place to store your shoes in the lobby or stored away in a locker. Take off your socks when you practice, too. You may find that wearing socks will be too slippery on your mat: another distraction. You'll find that your bare feet will stick better to your yoga mat for better traction and movement throughout the class.
 

Don't Eat Too Much

Wear Comfortable Clothing

Take Your Shoes & Socks Off

As you begin your yoga practice, there is no need to push too hard or go too fast. Take your time, go at your own pace. Listen to your body. Some of the yoga postures can be challenging and perhaps beyond your limits as a beginner. That's ok; modify your poses. The instructor will demonstrate ways to modify yoga postures to fit your current level and ability. Pay attention to these instructions. Over time, you will see a natural progression and improvement. 




Breathing is an important element in any style of yoga you practice. Your instructor will continue to remind you to focus on your breath. The one thing you want to avoid is holding your breath. Some postures may feel strenuous and cause you to hold your breath. This is counterproductive to the practice; this is when it is necessary to take a deeper breath in order for your body to fully move into the yoga pose. Consistent and mindful breathing keeps your body well oxygenated as you move from pose to pose.



 

Another mistake to avoid is locking your joints in certain yoga poses (e.g. Seated Forward Fold, Downward Facing Dog). Some postures encourage full extension of your limbs, but it is not necessary to lock your joints in these positions. It is best to keep a slight bend in your knees or elbows, for example, so you can maintain muscle engagement in your yoga pose. Otherwise, you way produce too much strain (or potential damage) to your delicate joints.



 

Having trouble touching your toes in a Standing Forward Fold? No worries, use yoga props to help you. Some studios are equipped with props like blocks and straps to assist you in some postures. You can use several stacked yoga blocks to rest your hands when you practice a forward bend. Bolsters, blankets, and sandbags are other useful tools to use in yoga class to support you in some of the yoga poses taught.
 
Consider these 11 tips as you continue your journey as a new yoga student.

These next few tips will focus on your actual practice so that you can have the best experience when you're new to yoga.

Take Your Time

Keep Breathing

Don't Lock Your Joints

Use Props

As you begin your yoga practice, there is no need to push too hard or go too fast. Take your time, go at your own pace. Listen to your body. Some of the yoga postures can be challenging and perhaps beyond your limits as a beginner. That's ok; modify your poses. The instructor will demonstrate ways to modify yoga postures to fit your current level and ability. Pay attention to these instructions. Over time, you will see a natural progression and improvement. 



Breathing is an important element in any style of yoga you practice. Your instructor will continue to remind you to focus on your breath. The one thing you want to avoid is holding your breath. Some postures may feel strenuous and cause you to hold your breath. This is counterproductive to the practice; this is when it is necessary to take a deeper breath in order for your body to fully move into the yoga pose. Consistent and mindful breathing keeps your body well oxygenated as you move from pose to pose.



 Another mistake to avoid is locking your joints in certain yoga poses (e.g. Seated Forward Fold, Downward Facing Dog). Some postures encourage full extension of your limbs, but it is not necessary to lock your joints in these positions. It is best to keep a slight bend in your knees or elbows, for example, so you can maintain muscle engagement in your yoga pose. Otherwise, you way produce too much strain (or potential damage) to your delicate joints.



Having trouble touching your toes in a Standing Forward Fold? No worries, use yoga props to help you. Some studios are equipped with props like blocks and straps to assist you in some postures. You can use several stacked yoga blocks to rest your hands when you practice a forward bend. Bolsters, blankets, and sandbags are other useful tools to use in yoga class to support you in some of the yoga poses taught.
 
Consider these 11 tips as you continue your journey as a new yoga student.

These next few tips will focus on your actual practice so that you can have the best experience when you're new to yoga.

Take Your Time

Keep Breathing

Don't Lock Your Joints

Use Props

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